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An Assyrian King and His Chief Minister

An Assyrian King and His Chief Minister.png Assyrian Warrior (temp. Sargon II)ThumbnailsMythological PersonageAssyrian Warrior (temp. Sargon II)ThumbnailsMythological PersonageAssyrian Warrior (temp. Sargon II)ThumbnailsMythological PersonageAssyrian Warrior (temp. Sargon II)ThumbnailsMythological PersonageAssyrian Warrior (temp. Sargon II)ThumbnailsMythological PersonageAssyrian Warrior (temp. Sargon II)ThumbnailsMythological PersonageAssyrian Warrior (temp. Sargon II)ThumbnailsMythological Personage
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It was out of those two main weaknesses of all priesthoods, namely, the incapacity for efficient military leadership and their inevitable jealousy of all other religious cults, that the power of secular kingship arose. The foreign enemy either prevailed and set up a king over the people, or the priesthoods who would not give way to each other set up a common fighting captain, who retained more or less power in peace time. This secular king developed a group of officials about him and began, in relation to military organization, to take a share in the priestly administration of the people’s affairs. So, growing out of priestcraft and beside the priest, the king, the protagonist of the priest,appears upon the stage of human history, and a very large amount of the subsequent experiences of mankind is only to be understood as an elaboration, complication, and distortion of the struggle, unconscious or deliberate, between these two systems of human control, the temple and the palace. And it was in the original centres of civilization that this antagonism was most completely developed.

Author
The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Outline of History - Being a Plain History of Life and Mankind, by H. G. Wells published 1920
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